New Publications from Human Rights Watch

The following reports have recently been published by the Human Rights Watch organization:

Spiraling Violence

Spiraling Violence

Spiraling Violence: Boko Haram Attacks and Security Force Abuses in Nigeria
By Human Rights Watch.

This 98-page report catalogues atrocities for which Boko Haram has claimed responsibility. It also explores the role of Nigeria’s security forces, whose own alleged abuses contravene international human rights law and might also constitute crimes against humanity. The violence, which first erupted in 2009, has claimed more than 2,800 lives.

The report, which includes a photo essay, is based on field research in Nigeria between July 2010 and July 2012, and the continuous monitoring of media reports of Boko Haram attacks and statements since 2009. Human Rights Watch researchers interviewed 135 people, including 91 witnesses and victims of Boko Haram violence or security forces abuses, as well as lawyers, civil society leaders, government officials, and senior military and police personnel.

[Download Full Report]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

Toxic Tanneries

Toxic Tanneries

Toxic Tanneries: The Health Repercussions of Bangladesh’s Hazaribagh Leather
By Human Rights Watch.

This report documents an occupational health and safety crisis among tannery workers, both men and women, including skin diseases and respiratory illnesses caused by exposure to tanning chemicals, and limb amputations caused by accidents in dangerous tannery machinery. Residents of Hazaribagh slums complain of illnesses such as fevers, skin diseases, respiratory problems, and diarrhea, caused by the extreme tannery pollution of air, water, and soil. The government has not protected the right to health of the workers and residents, has consistently failed to enforce labor or environmental laws in Hazaribagh, and has ignored High Court orders to clean up these tanneries.

[Download Full Report]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

Abusive System

Abusive System

Abusive System: Failures of Criminal Justice in Gaza
By Human Rights Watch

This 43-page report documents extensive violations by Hamas security services, including warrantless arrests, failure to inform families promptly of detainees’ whereabouts, and subjecting detainees to torture. It also documents violations of detainees’ rights by prosecutors and courts. Military courts frequently try civilians, in violation of international law. Prosecutors often deny detainees access to a lawyer, and courts have failed to uphold detainees’ due process rights in cases of warrantless arrest and abusive interrogations, Human Rights Watch found.

[Download Full Report]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

“Like a Death Sentence”

“Like a Death Sentence”

“Like a Death Sentence”: Abuses against Persons with Mental Disabilities in Ghana.
By Human Rights Watch

This report describes how thousands of people with mental disabilities are forced to live in psychiatric institutions and spiritual healing centers, often against their will and with little possibility of challenging their confinement. In psychiatric hospitals, people with mental disabilities face overcrowding and unsanitary conditions. In some of the spiritual healing centers, popularly known as prayer camps, they are often chained to trees, frequently in the baking sun, and forced to fast for weeks as part of a “healing process,” while being denied access to medications.

The report also highlights the challenges of people with mental disabilities who live in the community, who face stigma and discrimination and often lack adequate shelter, food, and healthcare.

 

For a Better Life

For a Better Life

For a Better Life: Migrant Worker Abuse in Bahrain and the Government Reform Agenda
By Human Rights Watch

This 123-page report documents the many forms of abuse and exploitation suffered by migrant workers in Bahrain and details the government’s efforts to provide redress and strengthen worker protections. Bahraini authorities need to implement labor safeguards and redress mechanisms already in place and prosecute abusive employers, Human Rights Watch said. The government should extend the 2012 private sector labor law to domestic workers, who are excluded from key protections.

[Download Full Report and also Download the Appendices and also Download the summary and recommendations: Photo feature]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

“Will I Get My Dues … Before I Die?”

“Will I Get My Dues … Before I Die?”

“Will I Get My Dues … Before I Die?”: Harm to Women from Bangladesh’s Discriminatory Laws on Marriage, Separation, and Divorce
By Human Rights Watch

This 109-page report documents how the country’s discriminatory and archaic personal laws impoverish many women at separation or divorce, and trap some women in violent marriages because they fear destitution. Current laws deprive women of an equal right to marital property. The limited entitlements these laws offer women are poorly enforced by family courts and local government arbitration councils. Female-headed households and women facing domestic violence struggle to access critical state support and social assistance. Together, these problems mean there is scant economic protection or security for women when marriages break down.

[Download Full Report and also Download the Report in Bengali]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

Ad Hoc and Inadequate

Ad Hoc and Inadequate

Ad Hoc and Inadequate: Thailand’s Treatment of Refugees and Asylum Seekers
By Human Rights Watch

This 143-page report finds that Thai refugee policies are not grounded in law and cause refugees of all nationalities to be exploited and unnecessarily detained and deported. The report focuses on the plight of Burmese refugees, the largest current refugee group in Thailand. It examines treatment and conditions of both Burmese refugees inside the camps on the Thai-Burma border and Burmese outside the camps, who are not officially recognized as refugees. The report also looks at the impact of political changes in Burma on the prospects for repatriation and the obstacles to resolving this protracted refugee situation.

[Download Full Report]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

Classrooms in the Crosshairs

Classrooms in the Crosshairs

Classrooms in the Crosshairs: Military Use of Schools in Yemen’s Capital
By Human Rights Watch

This 46-page report details the occupation of schools by government security forces, militias, and opposition armed groups, risking the lives and education of tens of thousands of students. Forces on both sides used schools as barracks, bases, surveillance posts, and firing positions. Combatants also stored weapons and ammunition, detained prisoners, and in some cases tortured or otherwise abused detainees on school grounds or in school buildings.

[Download Full Report]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

“Between Two Sets of Guns”

“Between Two Sets of Guns”

“Between Two Sets of Guns”: Attacks on Civil Society Activists in India’s Maoist Conflict
By Human Rights Watch

The 60-page report documents human rights abuses against activists in India’s Orissa, Jharkhand, and Chhattisgarh states. Human Rights Watch found that grassroots activists who deliver development assistance and publicize abuses in Maoist conflict areas are at particular risk of being targeted by government security forces and Maoist insurgents, known as Naxalites. Maoists frequently accuse activists of being informers and warn them against implementing government programs. The police demand that they serve as informers, and those that refuse risk being accused of being Maoist supporters and subject to arbitrary arrest and torture. The authorities use sedition laws to curtail free speech and also concoct criminal cases to lock up critics of the government.

[Download Full Report and Download the full report in Oriya]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

"Even a 'Big Man' Must Face Justice"

“Even a ‘Big Man’ Must Face Justice”

“Even a ‘Big Man’ Must Face Justice”: Lessons from the Trial of Charles Taylor
By Human Rights Watch

This 55-page report analyzes the practice and impact of Taylor’s trial by the United Nations-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone. The report examines the conduct of the trial, including issues related to efficiency, fairness, and witnesses and sources. It also examines the court’s efforts to make its proceedings accessible to communities most affected by the crimes, and perceptions and initial impact of the trial in Sierra Leone and Liberia.

[Download Full Report and Télécharger le résumé et les recommandations en français]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

Torture in the Name of Treatment

Torture in the Name of Treatment

Torture in the Name of Treatment: Human Rights Abuses in Vietnam, China, Cambodia, and Lao PDR
By Human Rights Watch

More than 350,000 people identified as drug users are held in compulsory drug “treatment” centers in China and Southeast Asia. Detainees are held without due process for periods of months or years and may be subjected to physical and sexual abuse, torture, and forced labor. International donors and UN agencies have supported and funded drug detention centers, while centers have systematically denied detainees access to evidence-based drug dependency treatment and HIV prevention services. “Torture in the Name of Treatment,” summarizes Human Rights Watch’s findings over five years of research in China, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Lao PDR.

[Download the Brochure]
See Also – Further Details and Press Release.

 

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